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We Need this Musical to Stop us from Killing Ourselves — The Musical! Long on Title, Long on Fun….

By Ernest Kearney  —  Now the funny thing is that the title, We Need This Musical to Stop Us From Killing Ourselves the Musical! is slightly longer than the show.

Still, Glasgow Lyman and Jeff Rosick have mixed up a silly, stylish, toe-tapping little songfest on the subject of suicide that succeeds in every way.

Rosick plays Dr. Hansen, a psychiatrist with an id of gold.

When two of his patients, Mitch the actor (Lyman) and Sarah the songwriter (Adyn Wood), both, announce they intend to their-own-quietus-make, the caring doctor, in desperation, suggests they write a musical instead of self-slaughter.

Lyman and Rosick fill their very first musical venture with such tuneful ditties as “Shut the F**k Up,” “Looks Like its Suicide for Two,” and the eleventh hour number “Who Cares if You’re a Terrible Person — Don’t Be a Quitter”; which celebrates such social icons as Bill Cosby and Harvey Weinstein.

Rosick and Wood are superb and Lyman is pretty good too, but as producer he probably had a lot on his mind.

A director would have been a wise idea, but nevertheless Lyman and Rosick have a wickedly wonderful work for their first musical, and a solid GOLD MEDAL

 

♦     ♦     ♦

We Need This Musical to Stop Us From Killing Ourselves the Musical!

played during the Hollywood Fringe Festival 2018


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Written by

An award-winning L.A. playwright and rabble-rouser of note who has hoisted glasses with Orson Welles, been arrested on three continents and once beat up Charlie Manson. His first play, "Among the Vipers" was a semi-finalist in the Julie Harris Playwriting Competition and was featured in the Carnegie-Mellon Showcase of New Plays. It was produced at the NPT Theater in Ashland, Oregon and Los Angeles’ celebrated Odyssey Ensemble Theatre. His following play, “The Little Boy Who Loved Monsters” was produced at The Hollywood Actors Theater, where he earned praise from the Los Angeles Times for his “…inordinately creative writing.” The play went on to numerous other productions including Berlin’s The Black Theatre under the direction of Rainer Fassbinder who wrote in his program notes of Kearney, “He is a skilled playwright, but more importantly he is a dangerous one.” Ernest Kearney has worked as literary manager or as dramaturge for among others The Hudson Theater Guild, Nova Diem and the Odyssey Ensemble Theatre, where he still serves on the play selection committee. He has been the recipient of two Dramalogue Awards and a finalist or semi-finalist, three times, in the Julie Harris Playwriting Competition. His work has been performed by Michael Dunn, Sandra Tsing Loh, Jack Colvin and Billy Bob Thornton, and to date, either as playwright or director, he has upwards of a hundred and thirty productions under his belt, including a few at the Bob Baker Marionette Theater as puppeteer. After a wild and misspent youth, which lasted well into middle age, Kearney has settled down and is focusing on his writing, as well as living happily ever after with his lovely wife Marlene. Ernest’s stage reviews and social essays can be found at TheTVolution.com and workingauthor.com. Follow him on Facebook.

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